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Unit Contributions to Equity, Diversity, Inclusion submissions AY17-18

Department:

  • Unit Contributions to Equity, Diversity, Inclusion AY17-18 6442

    Department: 
    African Studies
    Division: 
    Social Sciences
    Academics
    1. Faculty: 

    Faculty who teach courses in the African Studies program come from nearly all UO colleges and schools, and include people with provenance from Africa, women, and men. All AFR faculty have research concerns that address diversity issues including: improving access to education, health, and economic mobility by marginalized groups; gender and identity; majority-minority dynamics within African countries, the Black diaspora (in the U.S., Central and South America, the Caribbean, Europe and other world regions), etc. The African Studies Program works hard to promote the teaching and scholarship of our faculty of color, and to make the UO a strong supportive community for their careers -- especially as they are drammatically of minority status on the UO campus. We highlight their scholarship via the African Studies Lecture Series, advertising their classes, and helping them make connections with others across campus.

    We would be delighted to be involved in hiring more faculty with African and/or Africanist backgrounds across campus.

    2. Staff: 

    We are staffed by the OCIAS office.

    3. Graduate Programs: 

    African Studies has an African Studies Graduate list and holds occasional events for graduate students with interests in Africa and African Studies. We rely on individual departments and colleges graduate-student recruiting processes; but attempt to foster community among such students via RIG groups, the African Studies Lecture Series, and mentoring research projects. We have a Graduate Certificate in African Studies which has attracted minority graduate students.

    4. Undergraduate Programs: 

    African Studies promotes undergraduate engagement with Africa and the African diaspora via a minor, study abroad programs, and Swahili and Arabic language study. We offer the undergraduate "Introduction to African Studies" course which engages students with a broad range of diversity issues (from economic, to justice, to gender, to religious, etc. factors). The course introduces undergraduate students to a wide range of faculty with whom they can continue to take courses that address African- and African-diasporic related topics. AFR faculty mentor undergraduate and honors theses on Africanist issues.

    5. Outreach and Partnerships: 

    - African Studies Lecture series (typically three speakers a term)
    - Support of on-campus symposia and conferences (past conferences and symposia include: Annual Conference on African Linguistics; Health in Africa; Everyday Life on the Continent: Fun, Leisure & Expressivity)

  • Unit Contributions to Equity, Diversity, Inclusion AY17-18 6440

    Department: 
    Political Science
    Division: 
    Social Sciences
    Academics
    1. Faculty: 

    We had a very active year with respect to diversity, with a new level of energy and excitement in the department. We took the following steps:

    1. Hiring

    We added two women of color to our faculty this year. Associate Professor Debra Thompson, previously in the Department of African-American Studies at Northwestern University, joined us as part of the Black Studies cluster hire. She is a specialist of the comparative politics of race, and will teach a new introductory course this year on the Black Lives Matter movement (as well as other related courses). Assistant Professor Yeling Tan is a specialist of Chinese and international political economy. She finished her PhD at Harvard's Kennedy School of Government and will spend 2017-18 as a postdoctoral fellow at Princeton University before joining us in fall 2018.

    Unfortunately we also lost a faculty member of color, Associate Professor Daniel HoSang (who had a .4 appointment with us, with the rest in Ethnic Studies). Still, the fact that he was recruited away to the American Studies program at Yale University speaks well of his professional development opportunities while at UO.

    2. Organizational reforms

    An ad hoc committee with broad participation successfully proposed the formation of a standing Equality and Inclusion Committee. It will begin operations in fall 2017. Many faculty also participated in the retention-focused May workshop for departments connected to the Black Studies cluster. At that workshop we proposed creating a system to track service burdens for faculty, such that we can pay attention to inequitable service. This tracking system is drafted and will be up and running for fall 2017.

    3. Graduate Programs: 

    We made very strong efforts to upgrade our identification and recruitment of underrepresented candidates this year for our PhD program. We extended advertising to new venues for female and minority students in political science, brought in a very diverse group of students for our recruitment weekend, and actively used UO resources (notably Promising Scholars funding) to recruit. We successfully corrected a run of years with low female enrollment, with an incoming class that is 66% female (4 of 6) and includes one student of color.

    4. Undergraduate Programs: 

    We proposed and passed at the department level a substantial reform of our undergraduate major. Among other changes, it upgrades the existing class PS 106 Power, Politics and Inequality to be one of three "core" classes. We also launched a new lower-division class that will substantially address diversity issues, PS 199 Ethics, Identity and Society.

    Staff
    1. University Service: 

    Staff serve on search committees, where equity, diversity, and inclusion are high priority.

    2. Departmental Contributions: 

    Daily interaction with a diverse community of students, staff, faculty, and visitors. Recognizing diversity in a broad and inclusive manner, staff interact with each individual; assessing needs and offering service or direction to appropriate resources.

    We serve faculty who are involved in research and teaching that are intrinsically immersed in questions of equity, diversity, and inclusion. Our media resources are utilized to highlight a diversity of faculty and student research. We are also involved in bringing guest speakers to campus, to offer a variety of world perspectives; many of these guest speakers research equity and diversity.

    Staff are encouraged to participate in conversations with other staff, faculty, and guests; recognizing that those moments can bring valuable perspective and will contribute to a strong sense of inclusion. We strive to provide an atmosphere that balances professionalism with the realities of being human; recognizing that different perspectives and experiences enrich our understanding of this growing community.

    4. Professional Development and Training: 
    Staff have been introduced to implicit bias and will participate in training and conversations as they become available on campus. Additionally, staff participate in conversations about diversity, inclusion, equity, and bias. We encourage staff to seek professional development opportunities and training.
  • Unit Contributions to Equity, Diversity, Inclusion AY17-18

    Department: 
    Romance Languages
    Division: 
    Humanities
  • Unit Contributions to Equity, Diversity, Inclusion AY17-18 6475

    Department: 
    Russian and East European Studies
    Division: 
    Humanities
    Academics
    1. Faculty: 

    Currently, all five REEES core faculty are women and two hail from outside of the U.S. Although REEES has not been in a position to make a permanent hire in a number of years, it has participated directly or weighed in on searches in the CHC and EALL that resulted in the hiring of diverse candidates who now serve as participating faculty in REEES and who have helped to expand REEES's offerings and, more importantly, to teach courses such as "Russian and Chinese Realisms" and "Self and Other in Russian Culture," which have attracted students from underrepresented groups. If allowed to hire in the future, REEES will make recruiting diverse candidates a high priority.

    2. Staff: 

    As part of an umbrella unit

    3. Graduate Programs: 

    REEES has had considerable success in the last ten years in recruiting underrepresent U.S. minorities and international students from Azerbaijan, China, Korea, Russia, and Ukraine. Almost all of our graduate students receive full funding in the form of GTF support, and having access to GTF support has been essential for attracting diverse candidates.
    Although our budget is small, we provide each of our M.A. students with the opportunity to apply for $250 once in their career to offset travel expenses to a regional, national, or international. Typically students apply for this funding in their second in the M.A. program, when they are completing their M.A. theses. REEES also holds a Biennial REEES Graduate Student Conference, which provides M.A. students in REEES and Ph.D. students in allied disciplines, to present research on various aspects of Russian, East European, and Eurasian studies.
    Given the geographical orientation of the discipline, and the fact that there is a sizable Slavic community in the state of Oregon, REEES is naturally concerned with providing its students at the graduate as well as undergraduate level with a global education, but one that also speaks to the diversity of the state. Our unit is unique among similar units across the nation insofar as we have a number of scholars working on and offering classes on Eurasia and on Russian-Asian literary and cultural connections.

    4. Undergraduate Programs: 

    REEES has done an excellent job in recent years of attracting a diverse student body that includes women, recent Slavic immigrants or children of immigrants, and students who are the first college students in their families. Unfortunately, REEES has a small budget and is not in a position to offer much in the way of financial support to undergraduates. However, as outlined in the previous section, we offer a diverse curriculum, and sponsor cultural events that are of great interest to the students and that foster awareness of the Slavic community in Oregon and beyond.

    5. Outreach and Partnerships: 

    Despite our historically small Services and Supplies budget, which was cut by 39% several years ago, REEES has played a very active role in sponsoring activities that foster knowledge and understanding about Russia, Eastern Europe, and Eurasia, as well as the Slavic community in Oregon and the Pacific Northwest. These events include, lectures, colloquia, a biennial graduate conference, musical performances, Russian teas, and an annual Russian play. All of these events are free and open to the public and are well attended by students, faculty, and community members alike.

    6. Other: 

    In winter 2014, REEES completed an extensive self-study in connection with its fifteen-year external program review. Please see this program review for a more detailed discussion of REEES's past diversity, equity, and inclusion initiatives. Initiatives that we have scheduled in the near future include a conference on "Russians in the Pacific Northwest: From Fort Ross to the Aleutian Islands" (April 6-7, 2018), which will include papers on the complex history of relations between Russians and Native Americans in the region, and a combined faculty and graduate student workshop on gender equity and inclusion in the Russian language classroom.

  • Unit Contributions to Equity, Diversity, Inclusion AY17-18

    Department: 
    Theatre Arts
    Division: 
    Humanities
    Academics
    1. Faculty: 

    Of our 12 full-time NTTF and TTF, 6 are women and 6 are men. Of the past 6 most recent hires, 4 are women, and 2 are men.
    Of the 3 Ph.D. faculty, one teaches and is currently a leader in scholarship on Arab and Arab-American theatre and film, and one regularly teaches Latino/Latina theatre and drama and Indigenous/Native theatre and drama. The third self-identifies as gay and teaches Advanced acting and graduate seminars on production theory and aesthetics, particularly queer/avant-garde/postmodern.

    2. Staff: 

    Our office staff includes an Office Manager and an Office Specialist 2, both of whom are women. Our Office Specialist is Native Hawaiian, and our Office Manager is Danish.

    3. Graduate Programs: 

    Of our 10 current graduate students in the M.A., M.F.A., and Ph.D. programs, 6 are women and 4 are men. Of these 10, one Ph.D. student self-identifies as Latina, another Ph.D. student self-identifies as Korean-American, one Ph.D. student self-identifies as Lebanese-American, and one Ph.D. student self-identifies as Native American. Recent Graduate Seminar topics have included African American theatre and popular entertainment, Arab-American Drama, Intra-Cultural Theatre, Native/Indigenous North American Drama, Latino/Latina theatre and drama. We made a major effort to recruit a new Ph.D. student from Ethiopia in fall of 2017, but the student was denied a visa to enter the U.S. He would have been the first Ethiopian scholar to hold a Ph.D in Theatre Arts.

    4. Undergraduate Programs: 

    Our undergraduate curriculum currently includes courses in Irish theatre, Arab-American theatre, Indigenous/Native North American theatre and drama. Soon, we will be offering a new course in costume design focused on problems in representation of ethnicities as well as self-definition in fashion. With donor support, we have instituted scholarships for first-generation and economically disadvantaged undergraduates seeking to participate in our annual Spring Break at the Oregon Shakespeare Festival (students see plays, take tours, have talks and do workshops with a wide variety of OSF professionals). We also have scholarship support for students seeking to participate in the London Theatre Program, which takes 18-20 students every other Spring term to London for 9 weeks. These funds have helped to support a steady improvement in racial/economic/ethnic diversity.

    5. Outreach and Partnerships: 

    We regularly use department funds, including UMRP funds, to support other departments and units who are hosting activities that enhance the intellectual diversity of the university community. Already in fall of 2017, we have committed to support the Anthropology Department's effort to organize a symposium on "Islam, Feminism, and Women's Mosque Movement," scheduled for October 27th. We have also committed to support the Department of Ethnic Studies in their effort to host Native American lawyer and author Mary Kathryn Nagle, who will be giving a public talk, “Sovereignty in the Law, Sovereignty in Our Stories,” on November 17. We look forward to many more such collaborations.